August 27, 2014

tumblrbot said: WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE INANIMATE OBJECT?

this picture:

image

8:45pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZjU3em1PNUKlk
Filed under: answered tumblrbot 
August 27, 2014

jeanox:

Players will control young female protagonist Nuna and her arctic fox as they try to rescue her homeland from an endless blizzard. Upper One calls itself the first indigenous-owned video game developer and publisher in the U.S. and Never Alone's inspiration comes from the centuries-old stories and folklore of the Iñupiat people native to the region. Priced at $15, it comes out this fall for PC, PS4 and Xbox One.

This game makes me so happy. This is what indie developers have an opportunity to create and what, in all likelihood, AAA companies will be forever blind to. Keep an eye on this one, guys it looks brilliant

(via )

8:20pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZjU3em1PNN8py
  
Filed under: never alone 
August 27, 2014

sprech4:

Concept art for Sound of Silence, a psychological horror game based on the idea of manipulating the game itself to prey on the player’s fears. You can watch the original concept video HERE.

This is a game I’ve been really hype about for the past year! I’m happy to see it finally go into production, because I think it has a lot of potential to revolutionize gameplay and programming mechanics horror games.

(Source: facebook.com, via )

August 27, 2014
commanderbyproxy:

fuchsiamae:

didyouknowgaming:

Gamers.
http://www.theesa.com/facts/pdfs/ESA_EF_2013.pdf

#loudly yells ‘THE STEREOTYPE ABOUT TEENAGE BOYS BEING THE REAL/ONLY GAMERS IS INCREASINGLY BECOMING OBSOLETE’ #’PLEASE STOP ACTING LIKE YOUR MARKET IS 100% STRAIGHT WHITE MEN WITH NO RESPECT FOR WOMEN OR FEMALE CHARACTERS’ #places megaphone on the ground and walks away

I will always and forever stand by those tags because it’s fucking bullshit that people try to use “their market” as an excuse for not having diversity in their games/media. I am tired of bullshit excuses about why everyone except young white straight men get treated like crap and ignored in the game industry and in games. I am tired of settling for “well, they do better with female/characters of color/queer characters than most other people, why can’t you be happy about that?”
This post and those statistics finally shoot down the “but we have to cater to these people, they’re the ones that buy the majority of our product!” excuse. Because it is not who buys your product. It is people who have managed to make their way into positions of power and don’t particularly want to change or challenge that. It is people who are perfectly happy living in their narrow worldview because it’s fine for them—because they can turn on the TV or pop in a game and 99.99% of the time they’ll see themselves, because they exist everywhere so why would they care if other people do, too? And then they’ll stand there and screech about how they can’t put those characters or that storyline in, it’ll alienate their market, when they’re pointedly not paying attention to who their market actually is. You don’t get to hide behind capitalism when you’re reading the damn figures wrong.
I will be happy when the media I consume accurately and fairly represents the people that actually exist in the world instead of a very narrow portion of it. I will be happy when people stop making excuses for why this is not the case and start actually doing something to fix it. Not before.

commanderbyproxy:

fuchsiamae:

didyouknowgaming:

Gamers.

http://www.theesa.com/facts/pdfs/ESA_EF_2013.pdf

  

I will always and forever stand by those tags because it’s fucking bullshit that people try to use “their market” as an excuse for not having diversity in their games/media. I am tired of bullshit excuses about why everyone except young white straight men get treated like crap and ignored in the game industry and in games. I am tired of settling for “well, they do better with female/characters of color/queer characters than most other people, why can’t you be happy about that?”

This post and those statistics finally shoot down the “but we have to cater to these people, they’re the ones that buy the majority of our product!” excuse. Because it is not who buys your product. It is people who have managed to make their way into positions of power and don’t particularly want to change or challenge that. It is people who are perfectly happy living in their narrow worldview because it’s fine for them—because they can turn on the TV or pop in a game and 99.99% of the time they’ll see themselves, because they exist everywhere so why would they care if other people do, too? And then they’ll stand there and screech about how they can’t put those characters or that storyline in, it’ll alienate their market, when they’re pointedly not paying attention to who their market actually is. You don’t get to hide behind capitalism when you’re reading the damn figures wrong.

I will be happy when the media I consume accurately and fairly represents the people that actually exist in the world instead of a very narrow portion of it. I will be happy when people stop making excuses for why this is not the case and start actually doing something to fix it. Not before.

(via )

August 27, 2014
theatlantic:

Desert Bus: The Worst Video Game Ever Created

The drive from Tucson, Arizona, to Las Vegas, Nevada, takes approximately eight hours when travelling in a vehicle whose top speed is forty-five miles per hour. In Desert Bus, an unreleased video game from 1995 conceived by the American illusionists and entertainers Penn Jillette and Teller, players must complete that journey in real time. Finishing a single leg of the trip requires considerable stamina and concentration in the face of arch boredom: the vehicle constantly lists to the right, so players cannot take their hands off the virtual wheel; swerving from the road will cause the bus’s engine to stall, forcing the player to be towed back to the beginning. The game cannot be paused. The bus carries no virtual passengers to add human interest, and there is no traffic to negotiate. The only scenery is the odd sand-pocked rock or road sign. Players earn a single point for each eight-hour trip completed between the two cities, making a Desert Bus high score perhaps the most costly in gaming.
Read more.

theatlantic:

Desert Bus: The Worst Video Game Ever Created

The drive from Tucson, Arizona, to Las Vegas, Nevada, takes approximately eight hours when travelling in a vehicle whose top speed is forty-five miles per hour. In Desert Bus, an unreleased video game from 1995 conceived by the American illusionists and entertainers Penn Jillette and Teller, players must complete that journey in real time. Finishing a single leg of the trip requires considerable stamina and concentration in the face of arch boredom: the vehicle constantly lists to the right, so players cannot take their hands off the virtual wheel; swerving from the road will cause the bus’s engine to stall, forcing the player to be towed back to the beginning. The game cannot be paused. The bus carries no virtual passengers to add human interest, and there is no traffic to negotiate. The only scenery is the odd sand-pocked rock or road sign. Players earn a single point for each eight-hour trip completed between the two cities, making a Desert Bus high score perhaps the most costly in gaming.

Read more.

(via )

8:19pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZjU3em1PNMl9N
  
Filed under: misc 
August 27, 2014
Call of the Void — A point and click adventure.
For a game design class I had last quarter, the big project was to make a game in about ten weeks in pairs of two and three. My partner and I decided to make a point-and-click adventure game—him on coding, me on writing, both of us on art—and it ended up getting selected to be shown at UCSC’s senior game award show!
The description, from the site:
Call of the Void is a point-and-click adventure game in which you take on the role of Victor, a scientist and professor living in a small college town. Over the past few years, Victor has dedicated his life to completing his magnum opus, a machine that has the power to do amazing, terrible things.
Victor’s slowly sacrificed his friends, his money, and his job for this grand project, and at long last, the machine is almost complete. But whether or not that’s a good thing is for you to decide as you gather the last parts he needs and witness just how far Victor will go to perform his final experiment.
If you have questions or comments, please hit me up here, or contact me through Twitter or email (shayne [at] lostphysics [dot] co).

Call of the Void — A point and click adventure.

For a game design class I had last quarter, the big project was to make a game in about ten weeks in pairs of two and three. My partner and I decided to make a point-and-click adventure game—him on coding, me on writing, both of us on art—and it ended up getting selected to be shown at UCSC’s senior game award show!

The description, from the site:

Call of the Void is a point-and-click adventure game in which you take on the role of Victor, a scientist and professor living in a small college town. Over the past few years, Victor has dedicated his life to completing his magnum opus, a machine that has the power to do amazing, terrible things.

Victor’s slowly sacrificed his friends, his money, and his job for this grand project, and at long last, the machine is almost complete. But whether or not that’s a good thing is for you to decide as you gather the last parts he needs and witness just how far Victor will go to perform his final experiment.

If you have questions or comments, please hit me up here, or contact me through Twitter or email (shayne [at] lostphysics [dot] co).

(Source: callofthevoidgame.com, via )

8:18pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZjU3em1PNMVxx
  
Filed under: original game dev 
August 27, 2014
beatsandblades:


Alaskan Tribe Starts Video Game Studio

They could have put their money into more traditional businesses, like a funeral home or a dry cleaner or real estate development. Instead, the Cook Inlet Tribal Council of Alaska chose to fund a video games company. They say it’s the first one in the United States owned by indigenous people.
Upper One Games announced its founding this week at the Games For Change Festival in New York. USA Today reports that it will partner with E-Media, a New York-based company founded by a former Activision executive, to release two titles next year. (A screenshot of one is above). The tribe’s president said they looked to video games, instead of other investments, because they wanted to connect their efforts to their youth.
One title, which is planned for a commercial release, will be based on traditional Alaska stories, though subsequent efforts will explore other cultures as well. As for the studio’s name, Upper One is a play on Lower 48, the term by which Alaskans commonly refer to the contiguous United States.



This is freakin’ awesome!! :D
[source]

beatsandblades:

Alaskan Tribe Starts Video Game Studio

They could have put their money into more traditional businesses, like a funeral home or a dry cleaner or real estate development. Instead, the Cook Inlet Tribal Council of Alaska chose to fund a video games company. They say it’s the first one in the United States owned by indigenous people.

Upper One Games announced its founding this week at the Games For Change Festival in New York. USA Today reports that it will partner with E-Media, a New York-based company founded by a former Activision executive, to release two titles next year. (A screenshot of one is above). The tribe’s president said they looked to video games, instead of other investments, because they wanted to connect their efforts to their youth.

One title, which is planned for a commercial release, will be based on traditional Alaska stories, though subsequent efforts will explore other cultures as well. As for the studio’s name, Upper One is a play on Lower 48, the term by which Alaskans commonly refer to the contiguous United States.

This is freakin’ awesome!! :D

[source]

(via )

8:17pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZjU3em1PNL_IQ
  
Filed under: misc 
August 27, 2014
PlayThinker: Brainstorm your game from the bottom up.

PlayThinker is a card deck that helps you brainstorm your next game from its most basic elements.

This is interesting. I haven’t tried the game/deck out, but it seems like it’d be a cool way to warm up and condition that game dev muscle.

(Source: )

8:17pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZjU3em1PNM3yX
  
Filed under: game dev original 
August 27, 2014

gamersagainstbigotry:

This week GAB are looking at the benefits of gaming. We’ve almost drowned ourselves in discussing race and geek girls - and it’s high time we had a nice break to feel warm and fuzzy.

Lets remind ourselves of not only why we love gaming, but why it can be good for us.

We’ll be posting and linking things like the one above (source: http://visual.ly/gaming-good-you) here, and on our Twitter, Facebook & Website.
And you can share your questions and stories with us by dropping us an Ask.

Merry Gaming :)

(via )

8:16pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZjU3em1PNLuXC
  
Filed under: misc 
August 27, 2014
the creepy side of E3

You might not have heard about the security guard that groped a journalist at this year’s E3. Or the writer who gave a PR woman his business card by slipping it in her dress. Or the women presumed to be booth babes simply because of the way they looked.

E3 is the busiest time to be working in the games industry or as a reporter covering the scene. It’s the biggest, most important event of the year. But with roughly 50,000 attendees, it’s also sometimes the creepiest.

I think I was going to try and add some enlightening/relevant commentary onto this, but really, the excerpt does enough. Especially the first paragraph.

(Source: sybilreiszs, via )

8:16pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZjU3em1PNLqFX
  
Filed under: gaming culture 
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